Farina Camping Grounds and Walking Trails

 

Considerable improvements have been made to this site over the past couple of years. Hot showers and toilets are now located near the Southern edge of the park, and there has been a significant increase in lawned areas (the condition of the lawn is somewhat dependant on summer rains – that have been significant during the past few years, and this year the lawns are looking really lush).

To the East (downstream in the Leigh Creek), some of the (in places) dense creekside undergrowth has been cleared and walking trails have been made. The native couch grass has been mown to make the trail easy to follow, and where the trail intersects other sections, clearly marked signage has been provided.

The walks are ideal for family wanders, with lots of interesting birds hiding in the bushes and trees. Younger children could probably be engaged for hours seeking out the many birds. Whilst I was walking and photographing the tracks, the birds were very vocal.

Interestingly, when I stopped to get a good look at the source of all the noise – it stopped! I assume the original racket was because the birds were reporting my presence and progress to all and sundry, but when I stopped, they hid – making no noise.

That being the case, it’ll take some patience for those that are interested, to wait for the first bird to break cover and be identified!

At the South Eastern end of the walking trails, the railway bridges that cross the extensive floodplain can be found. The standard gauge bridge is the only one still standing, and should only be viewed from the creek bed. However, at the Southern (road end) of the trail, a railed viewing platform is in place. This enables safe walking onto the old bridge, an offers a great panorama to the west of the old township.

If young explorers want to see more, and be more involved in finding the original narrow gauge line, once the first bridge is found, proceed South until the first roadway and information board is found, then turn Easterly and travel on the road for about 50 metres or so. The remains of the original narrow gauge line can then be found.

If young explorers want to see more, and be more involved in finding the original narrow gauge line, once the first bridge is found, proceed South until the first roadway and information board is found, then turn left and travel on the road for about 50 metres or so. the remains of the original narrow gauge line can be found running through low saltbush, travelling North. The line runs through the reclaiming scrub across the wide floodway for about 1500 metres. Some care should be exercised in identifying the track and the occasional short bridge section, as it disappears from time to time because of flood and undergrowth.

Be aware that this is a bush track marked by star pickets every 30M and is rough in places. Study the map of the track at the storyboard at it’s southern end, or on the map on the standard gauge bridge at the other end of the track.

The track starts by running through low saltbush, travelling North. The line runs through the reclaiming scrub across the wide floodway for about 1500 metres. Some care should be exercised in identifying the track and the occasional short bridge section, as it disappears from time to time because of flood damage, and must be relocated whilst heading in a Northerly direction. Keep a lookout for old sleepers, railway “dogs” (the big fat bolt/nails that are used to fix the rails to their supporting sleepers) that are scattered around either side of the old track, and must not be removed!

If you happen to lose your way, look down to the South (the way you came), and locate the water tower low on the horizon. Head for that and you’re on your way back to the Farina township.

When you eventually get to the northern causeway (past the wooden trestles) the track continues to the southwest until you get to the Northern Standard gauge bridge.

On the way back to the camping area from the Northern standard gauge bridge, you can travel on either side of the creek. If you cross to the Southern side of the creek, you will see the two wells that were dug to obtain water from the artesian basin. These wells are very close to the camp grounds, and signal the end of your exploring experience.